Double Back Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

Double Back Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

The Double Back Stitch is the shadow work stitch but pulled with a slight or medium tension. This stitch is worked over two rows and can go in any direction. This is one stitch where a slightly different colored thread might be appropriate. The crossed patterns on the underneath of the fabric comes through the fabric, thus the name “Shadow work”. It also seems to give a little more dimension to the fabric caught in between the two rows.

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Greek Cross (for Pulled Thread)

Greek Cross (for Pulled Thread)

Pull this stitch tight as you work. Here is a diagram showing how it is represented on a chart and then how it is done. Begin in the center hole and complete each arm of the cross. Pay attention to where your needle comes up in the center so that you are crossing over the previous arm. I have tried to illustrate that using different colors for each arm. When you finish the fourth arm, bring your needle through the center hole so that you are below the 4th stitch. You make a stitch in the center that goes over the 4th and 1st stitch to pull all the stitches together.

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Faggot Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

Faggot Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

The amount of pull determines how large the resulting space is. In the examples I found the stitch was worked opposite of how I learned it for Hardanger. The straight stitches are on the front and the diagonal stitches are on the back of the fabric. Here it is shown in a single and double diagonal.

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Four Sided Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

Four Sided Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

This stitch is also used a lot in pulled work. The rows can be diagonal, horizontal or vertical. This stitch can be worked in a single row or in multiple rows. If you repeat your wrap it creates a tighter pull, thus larger holes. It is shown here as a row of single wraps, then a row of double wraps and two rows of single wraps.

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Cross Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

Cross Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

It is exactly as it sounds, there is an “X” stitch made with varying levels of tension. However, the “X” is made in two passes. You work one side of the “X” and then come back to finish the “X”. The size of thread and the amount of pull you use will give you widely diverse results. It is fun to experiment with this stitch.

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Straight Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

Straight Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

Instead of letting your thread lie nicely on the fabric, you give it a pull. The tighter you pull the thread, the smaller a line it makes. The resulting line is called a straight or corded stitch. It is very important to pay attention to the direction you are to be pulling your thread. Here are some examples of directions you could work your satin stitches.

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