Eyelet

Eyelet

Eyelet

The eyelet stitch is often added between the buttonhole edge and the satin stitch blocks. It can also be used in the center of a star motif or in the middle of four satin stitch blocks, as shown in Figure 15a. Securing the thread on the wrong side of the fabric, bring it up in the center hole where the eyelet will be worked. Then work around each hole of the square, each time returning to the center hole (15a). No fabric threads are cut to form the eyelet but each stitch is pulled to the outside, forming a larger center hole (15b).


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Webs (Dove’s Eyes) (for Hardanger)

Webs

Webs (Dove’s Eyes)

These lacy fillers go quickly and add much to any piece of Hardanger embroidery. Weave 3.5 bars. To insert a web, bring the needle up through the center of the adjacent woven bar (4a). Bring the needle under the first side of the web and then up through the center of the next woven bar (4b). Proceed to the third bar and repeat 4b. Pass the needle under the third side of web and pull needle through to create the twist. Complete the web by bringing the needle over the first side of the web and up through the center of the unfinished bar (4c). Finish by weaving the last half bar.


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Woven Bars (for Hardanger)

Woven Bars

Woven Bars

After completing the cutting, there will be a network of threads left, all in groups of four. These will be woven into bars with pearl cotton, usually size #8 or #12. Secure the end of the thread into the satin stitches on the back of the fabric and bring the needle to the right side of the fabric through the middle of the four threads. Bring the needle around the threads on one side and then back to the middle (3a). Repeat on the opposite side (3b). Continue weaving in a figure-eight pattern until the entire bar is filled. It is extremely important that the weaving be very tight and even; therefore, pull each stitch firmly before continuing. When one bar is complete, cross over to the next bar by bringing the needle from the far side of the completed bar up into the center of the next bar (3c). This will leave a small crossover thread on the back of the work.


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Double Back Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

Double Back Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

The Double Back Stitch is the shadow work stitch but pulled with a slight or medium tension. This stitch is worked over two rows and can go in any direction. This is one stitch where a slightly different colored thread might be appropriate. The crossed patterns on the underneath of the fabric comes through the fabric, thus the name “Shadow work”. It also seems to give a little more dimension to the fabric caught in between the two rows.

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Greek Cross (for Pulled Thread)

Greek Cross (for Pulled Thread)

Pull this stitch tight as you work. Here is a diagram showing how it is represented on a chart and then how it is done. Begin in the center hole and complete each arm of the cross. Pay attention to where your needle comes up in the center so that you are crossing over the previous arm. I have tried to illustrate that using different colors for each arm. When you finish the fourth arm, bring your needle through the center hole so that you are below the 4th stitch. You make a stitch in the center that goes over the 4th and 1st stitch to pull all the stitches together.

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Faggot Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

Faggot Stitch (for Pulled Thread)

The amount of pull determines how large the resulting space is. In the examples I found the stitch was worked opposite of how I learned it for Hardanger. The straight stitches are on the front and the diagonal stitches are on the back of the fabric. Here it is shown in a single and double diagonal.

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