Herringbone

Herringbone stitch

Variation 1

Herringbone stitch

Four Step Herringbone

The Herringbone stitch is a very versatile stitch because it can be worked up, down, or around as a border. Using a different color each trip adds interest to the finished area.

The Herringbone is worked one row at a time from left to right. The first example shows how to do the stitch when the rows do not overlap. The second example is the Four Step Herringbone. You place your first row down (blue) and then your second row (red) begins to the right of your first row and stitched over the first row. Repeat with rows three (yellow) and four (green).



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Turkey Work

Turkey Work stitch

Turkey work is a fun stitch that can be used for Santa’s beard, animal fur, and fuzzy flowers. You can cut the loops for maximum fuzz or leave them looped for depth. This stitch is worked in rows from left to right, from the bottom row to the top row. Turkeywork has some “rules” to make your stitching work the way you want it to. It is the last stitch to do because it is hard to maneuver around this stitch. You will be starting and stopping your thread at each end. It’s important to have enough thread to make it the entire length of your row. You can skip a row if your thread is very bulky.

This stitch is worked in groups of two in order to lock the stitch so it won’t unravel when you cut it. If get to the end of your row and you only have one canvas thread left, you need to include it in your last group (so you’ll have three threads). If you want your loops to be even, you may want to use a laying tool or a pencil as you make your loops. One stitcher said to cut the rows as you finish them, while another one said to cut everything when you are completely done. You will find out what works best for you as you experiment with this stitch.



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Woven

Woven stitch

Variation 1

Woven stitch

Variation 2

The Woven stitch looks like the weaving of a basket. It is great for backgrounds because it quickly covers the fabric. You work this stitch in horizontal rows as shown. Be sure to include the short stitches, called compensation stitches, around your design area or you will have holes at the edges of your area. Compare these two examples, both called Woven stitch by various authors. The first one has compensation stitches, while the second one has open spaces.



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Diagonal Tent Stitch (Basketweave)

Basketweave stitch

The basketweave stitch (or diagonal tent stitch) is a universal stitch, one you can use for small or large areas. While the front of the stitch will look like the Continental stitch, the back will resemble a woven wicker basket. Because of the way this stitch is worked, it is a very sturdy stitch, actually reinforcing your canvas, while not pulling it out of shape like the Continental or tent stitch can do.

The basketweave stitch is worked in diagonal rows up and down the canvas. You begin at the upper left corner. Stitch according to the diagram below until you reach the bottom right corner. Then work the next row to the left of the one you just stitched going from lower right hand to upper left hand, filling in between the stitches from the previous row. TIP: You need to look at your canvas to see how the canvas vertical and horizontal stitches intersect. To correctly cover your canvas, you should be covering the vertical canvas threads as you go down, covering the horizontal canvas threads as you stitch back up.



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Basketweave (diagonal tent stitch)

Basketweave stitch

The basketweave stitch (or diagonal tent stitch) is a universal stitch, one you can use for small or large areas. While the front of the stitch will look like the Continental stitch, the back will resemble a woven wicker basket. Because of the way this stitch is worked, it is a very sturdy stitch, actually reinforcing your canvas, while not pulling it out of shape like the Continental or tent stitch can do.

The basketweave stitch is worked in diagonal rows up and down the canvas. You begin at the upper left corner. Stitch according to the diagram below until you reach the bottom right corner. Then work the next row to the left of the one you just stitched going from lower right hand to upper left hand, filling in between the stitches from the previous row. TIP: You need to look at your canvas to see how the canvas vertical and horizontal stitches intersect. To correctly cover your canvas, you should be covering the vertical canvas threads as you go down, covering the horizontal canvas threads as you stitch back up.



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