Blanket Stitch Edge (for Hardanger)

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Blanket

Blanket Stitch Edge

The blanket stitch edge is a very traditional and attractive way to finish a piece of Hardanger embroidery. It is usually worked around a border of satin stitch blocks, but can also be used alone. It is worked similar to the satin stitch blocks, using the heavier weight thread with each stitch covering four threads of the fabric. The difference is the needle will now go straight with the fabric and will be brought through the loop to produce a ridge (14a). After completing the five stitches that correspond with the five stitches of the satin stitch block, form the rounded corner. Pivot in the same corner hole that the fifth stitch used and work three diagonal corner stitches (14b). Embroider the first stitch of the next series in the same corner hole (14c). Thus, there will be five stitches sharing the corner hole. After completing the next five buttonhole stitches corresponding to the satin stitch block, pivot the needle and come up in the same corner hole again (14d) forming the second type of corner.

When the entire edge is complete, secure the stitches with a sewing machine. Using short stitches and matching thread, sew around the border just inside the ridge. Then trim as close to the buttonhole edge as possible without clipping the thread.



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New 2010 Award Winning Designs Book DEAL!

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Our wall in the back sale room at Nordic is playing host to the winning designs and honorable mentions from the new 2010 Award Winning Designs in Hardanger book, and let me tell you, seeing them in person is unbelievable! The display will be up until the 17th… know what else is happening until the 17th? We are running a deal for you! When you purchase the new 2010 Award book, you have the option to receive the 2005 Award book FREE! Niiice.

One of my favorite designs from the new book is a totally awesome Norwegian theme table center that actually includes satin stitch Viking ships (amazing!), Stave churches and an excerpt from Norway’s national anthem: “Ya vi elsker dette landet” (“Yes, we love this land”)! The other designs are fantastic as well, but that one just took the cake for me. Get your copy today and check out these unique Hardanger creations for yourself!

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Carol Pedersen’s Here Tonight!

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Hardanger Tips, Tricks, and Fix-Its I can’t wait for tonight to get here!  Carol Pedersen is in town to give us some great advice from her new Hardanger Tips, Tricks, and Fix-Its Book, #0637.  She has put together a valuable resource for stitchers including how to get your project organized and how to improve the speed and elegance of your stitching.

We won’t have time to get to the fix-its, but Carol has provided five case studies to walk anyone through how to fix stitching and cutting errors.  There is even some tips on how to restore the edges of older Hardanger embroidery.  After tonight I can forge ahead with confidence (and be able to clean up any uff da’s I make!)   Wish you could be here!

Check out Carol Pedersen Designs »

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Woven Triple Spokes

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Woven Triple Spokes

Woven Triple Spokes

After wrapping of the bars is complete, bring your needle up at point A, two threads into the fabric. Insert the needle in the center hole B. As the thread is brought back to A, wrap it around the suspended thread two times, keeping the suspended thread tight at all times. Insert the needle at A and bring it out at C. Repeat the procedure to produce a second suspended spoke. Insert the needle at C and bring it out at D. Insert needle at B and bring it up between the wrapped bar and the D thread. Now start to weave by passing the needle over the D thread, under the C thread, and over the A thread. See diagram 18A. Weave back by passing the needle under A, over C, and under D. Continue weaving in this manner until the space is filled. Insert the needle into the satin stitch block and move to the next corner (18B). Repeat all the way around.



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Flower Filling

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Flower Filling

Flower Filling

To create our Flower Filling stitch, take the double circular web one step further by adding another web in the center, like doing a Dove’s eye. When finishing, conceal the thread behind the loop of the circular web taking it out to the kloster block to bury your thread.



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Double Circular Web

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Double Circular Web

Double Circular Web

To do the Double Circular Web you work the circular web without the additional twists. The second circle is created by running the needle through the loops of the circular web. Finish by inserting the needle into the hole where the web began.



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