Sequin Attachment Stitches

Sequin (Paillette) Attachment Method 1
Sequin (Paillette) Attachment Method 1

Method 1
Come up on the outside of the paillette and stitch down into the same hole in the center. Repeat this on the remaining three sides. Try to keep a consistent direction/pattern for each paillette (e.g. clockwise/top-bottom-left-right/etc.). (Figure T.)

Sequin (Paillette) Attachment Method 2
Sequin (Paillette) Attachment Method 2

Method 2
Come up through the middle of one paillette and one bead, stacked with the bead on top. Take your needle back down through the paillette into the fabric (skipping the bead) through the same hole you came up. (Figure U.)


« Back to Stitches

Bead Attachment: Whip Stitch Bugle Bead

Whip Stitch Bugle Bead
Whip Stitch Bugle Bead

The thing to keep in mind when working with bugle beads is that they are made from a long piece of glass. When the bead is cut, the ends can have sharp edges which can cause your thread to fray and eventually break. If your design allows for it, you can help prevent this by adding a seed bead at each end of your bugle bead before stitching it down.

For the whip stitch, start at the upper left-hand corner and take your thread through the bead. Stitch the bead down at whatever angle you need, making sure that your stitch extends just a little bit past the length of the bugle bead.



« Back to Stitches

Bead Attachment: Back Stitch Bugle Bead

Back Stitch Bugle Bead
Back Stitch Bugle Bead

The thing to keep in mind when working with bugle beads is that they are made from a long piece of glass. When the bead is cut, the ends can have sharp edges which can cause your thread to fray and eventually break. If your design allows for it, you can help prevent this by adding a seed bead at each end of your bugle bead before stitching it down.

For the back stitch you are placing the bead horizontal or vertical on the design. So bring your thread up at the end of your bead placement (in this example, it is the right side). Take your needle through the bead and down through the fabric at the other end of the bead. If possible, make a second stitch through the bugle bead so that you have two threads.

If you have a line of bugle beads, you can attach them individually with this technique. Come up at point A, through the bead and down at point B. Bring your thread back up at point C, which is a bead’s length away from point A. Come up at point C through the bead and down at point A. Bring your needle up at point D through the bead and back down at point C. This method helps reduce some of the tension and friction on the beads.



« Back to Stitches

Bead Attachment: Back Stitch Pair of Beads


4-point Grid
Back Stitch Pair of Beads
Back Stitch Pair of Beads

This is a great method for attaching a pair of beads. We’re going to use a longer grid this time, so here is a 4-point grid.

You bring your needle up at point 1 through both beads and down at 4. Come back up at 1 and go through the beads again and down at point 4 so you have two threads through the beads. To secure them on the line, come up through the fabric between the beads. Go over the top of the two threads and back down into the fabric.



« Back to Stitches

Bead Attachment: Back Stitch Single Bead


For a cross-stitch piece, most of the references indicate you want to use a half cross stitch, which will cause your bead to lay slightly on a slant. Whether you start from the upper or lower left corner, doesn’t make a difference. What is important is you always use the same slant for stitching. Imagine that the area where you are placing the bead is a square, divided into nine points. Your bead will cover section 5 when it is stitched down. If you start at 1 and go through the bead to 9, your bead will have a different slant than if you go from point 7 to 3.

Back Stitch Single Bead

Bead Attachment – Back Stitch Single Bead

If you want your beads to lie straight rather than on a slant, then you should use the back stitch method. Using the same 9-point box, you start your stitch coming up at Point 4 and through the bead (point 5) and down at point 6. (Example A) Come back up at point 4, through the bead, and back down at point 6, so you have two threads through the bead. (Example B). It is easy to do a column of these beads as you can see. It is a little more difficult to do single beads side by side. If you are doing single beads there really should be a little space between them.



« Back to Stitches

Bead Attachment: Whip Stitch Single Bead


For a cross-stitch piece, most of the references indicate you want to use a half cross stitch, which will cause your bead to lay slightly on a slant. Whether you start from the upper or lower left corner, doesn’t make a difference. What is important is you always use the same slant for stitching. Imagine that the area where you are placing the bead is a square, divided into nine points. Your bead will cover section 5 when it is stitched down. If you start at 1 and go through the bead to 9, your bead will have a different slant than if you go from point 7 to 3.

Whip Stitch Single Bead

Bead Attachment – Whip Stitch Single Bead

For this example, bring your needle to the upper left-hand corner (point 1) of where you want the bead to be (point 5). Take your needle through the bead and down at the lower right-hand corner (point 9). The next example shows how you would place your beads if they were in a line going straight down or across your fabric. The thing to remember about this method is that your beads are slanted!



« Back to Stitches